Geophysical methods make it possible for archaeologists to discovered new pieces of cultural heritage without ruining anything. Photo: Robert Fry

Archaeology without a shovel

Have you ever seen a researcher pushing a cart up and down a hill, or back and forth on a field? Then you might have seen a modern archaeologist at work.

The geit boat is to the left, the møring boat is to the right. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk

It’s called a goat boat, but it’s no goat

Are older, classical boat designs really better? High-tech testing in the Ship Towing Tank at the Norwegian Marine Technology Research Institute in Trondheim pits a 16th century classical rowboat against its newer, easier-to-build cousin.

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Monitoring neighbourhood electricity consumption

With more and more Norwegian households owning one or even two electric cars requiring charging overnight, how will we manage without sacrificing our hot morning shower and fresh bread for breakfast?

Brown trout or sea trout.

The secret life of the sea trout

Armed with special acoustic tags, a team of researchers is following 50 individual fish for as long as seven months to learn more about their life – and death — in Norwegian fjords.

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What do we do when a well blows out?

Oil and gas companies are worried about gas discharges at the sea bed. Recent field experiments can now quantify the volumes of gas reaching the sea surface and how they spread in the atmosphere.

Discovery Channel Canada videographer Mark Foerester films a 20 kg block of ice that is about to be catapulted into a steel beam. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk

Celebrity ice

Not since the Titanic has a block of ice been quite so famous. In early June, Discovery Channel Canada came to NTNU’s Structural Impact Laboratory (SIMLab) to watch ice researchers from NTNU’s Sustainable Arctic Marine and Coastal Technology programme use a giant machine to simulate what happens when a ship slams into an iceberg.