Metallgesellschaft, eksisterte som eget selskap fram til midten av 1990-årene, men er i dag en del det verdensomspenneneGEA Center. Bildet er fra selskapets kontor i Düsseldorf. Foto: GEA Center

The hidden companies

They are the companies you’ve never heard of, but they help grease the wheels of international trade.

We know that hormone mimics are harmful to us, and that they don’t break down naturally", says Per Stenstad.  They  accumulate in waste water and soil". Photo: Thor Nielsen.

Capturing false hormones

They damage our ability to reproduce, and they pollute the natural environment. Yet chemicals known as hormone mimics can be found in consumer goods. Eventually they end up in our water. But we now have a way of capturing them.

Listen to the sound of the movement of a quasar. photo: Thinkstock

A symphony of stars

Øyvind Brandtsegg has composed a piece that plays for seven consecutive years based on how gigantic antennas on the Earth rotate to find the most powerful stars in space.

Geophysical methods make it possible for archaeologists to discovered new pieces of cultural heritage without ruining anything. Photo: Robert Fry

Archaeology without a shovel

Have you ever seen a researcher pushing a cart up and down a hill, or back and forth on a field? Then you might have seen a modern archaeologist at work.

The geit boat is to the left, the møring boat is to the right. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk

It’s called a goat boat, but it’s no goat

Are older, classical boat designs really better? High-tech testing in the Ship Towing Tank at the Norwegian Marine Technology Research Institute in Trondheim pits a 16th century classical rowboat against its newer, easier-to-build cousin.

hus strøm ThinkStock

Monitoring neighbourhood electricity consumption

With more and more Norwegian households owning one or even two electric cars requiring charging overnight, how will we manage without sacrificing our hot morning shower and fresh bread for breakfast?

Brown trout or sea trout.

The secret life of the sea trout

Armed with special acoustic tags, a team of researchers is following 50 individual fish for as long as seven months to learn more about their life – and death — in Norwegian fjords.