Running fuel cells on bacteria

Researchers in Trondheim have succeeded in getting bacteria to power a fuel cell. The “fuel” used is wastewater, and the products of the process are pure water droplets and electricity.

New weapons in the battle against salmon lice

The best weapon in the battle against salmon lice in the Norwegian aquaculture industry has proved to be the use of what are called “cleaner fish”, fish that eat salmon lice. But these fish often die during breeding. Now, researchers have found a way to help the young fish survive.

Wind turbine builders put theory into practice

Engineering students at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) are learning about more than just theory. A competition to build the best wind turbine also gives them the chance to put their practical skills to the test.

Ductile materials for Arctic conditions

The production of oil and gas at temperatures between 40 and 60 degrees below zero means that researchers must advance the development of materials that can withstand these harsh conditions.

New sea slug species found in northern waters

Scientists have recently found a species of sea slug that has apparently made its way north from the Mediterranean Sea. Sometimes called sea slugs or sea butterflies, these mobile nudibranchs are carnivores that eat coral and jellyfish.

Nano-knowledge can lead to super solar cells

Atomic level changes in nanomaterials are contributing to incredible advances in solar cell and LED technology. NTNU researchers have found a way to design nanowires with a built-in current that will make them even more effective in solar cells.